Result detail

FeatureValue
microRNAhsa-miR-4716-5p
Chromosome1
Genomic Start Position120023035
Genomic End Position120023057
Base TypeInformationBase TypeTriplex structures can be classified into two types: Hoogsteen Triplexes and Reverse-Hoogsteen Triplexes. Hoogsteen Triplexes rely on Hoogsteen base pairings, and this pairing scheme dictates that the third strand be primarily "pyrimidine" bases and run parallel to the purine-rich strand of the duplex. Reverse-Hoogsteen Triplexes rely on Reverse-Hoogsteen base pairings, and this pairing scheme dictates that the third strand be primarily "purine" bases and run anti-parallel to the purine-rich strand of the duplex. A base type of "pyrimidine" indicates that the interaction is a Hoogsteen Triplex, and a base type of "purine" indicates that the interaction is a Reverse-Hoogsteen Triplex.pyrimidine
Hit ScoreInformationHit ScorePotential interactions between microRNAs and targets within their associated genome are evaluated using the Trident algorithm. Trident rates potential microRNA target sites using two methods. Here, "Hit Score" is a metric of complementarity, measuring how well the triplets of a triplex line up.308
Hit EnergyInformationHit Energy Potential interactions between microRNAs and targets within their associated genome are evaluated using the Trident algorithm. Trident rates potential microRNA target sites using two methods. Here, "Hit Energy" is a metric of thermodynamic stability, measuring the minimum free energy of an interaction. -353.02
Hit structureInformationHit structure This is a schematic of the microRNA/double stranded DNA interaction. The presence of a connector between a base on the duplex and a base on the third strand indicates a viable triplet.
UCUUCC-CCCUUCCUUUGUACCU
$$$$$$ $$$$$$$$$ $ $$$
AGAAGGAAGGAAGGAAAGAAGGA
TCTTCCTTCCTTCCTTTCTTCCT
Match Typedirect
Grade1
GenomeHomo sapiens (GRCh37.p5)
Genomic context Browse Trident Data (1000 basepair padding)   Browse Trident Data (5000 basepair padding)

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital | St. Jude Research